Permits 2017-06-26T20:51:38+00:00

Yes, if you are adding, replacing, relocating or removing an AC or furnace; or even simply adding ductwork. Permits are required to protect the homeowner. It ensures the work performed is safe and done in accordance with local building & electrical codes.
Any contractor failing to obtain a required permit is violating the law exposing you to additional cost and liability. If work was done without a required permit, you may be required to bring your home into compliance with current code requirements before selling it, in addition to possibly paying penalty permit fees and fines. Additionally, your homeowner’s insurance policy may be voided if it is found that work was done without a required permit.” California Energy Commission.
Yes, the contractor must provide a copy of the permit to the homeowner. Having a copy of the permit could assist in future legal issues; Insurance claims, real estate sale, etc.
No, in order for the permitting process to be considered complete.

    • To confirm that the work included on the permit meets current Title 24** requirements, an inspection by a certified third-party field verifier (***HERS rater) who is not associated with the contractor is required.
    • The HERS rater will then provide the homeowner with additional documentation that the local municipality requires during the inspection process.
    • At this point, it’s time to schedule the city / county**** inspector to your home to be sure that the work performed was done in accordance with local building codes free from any code violations.
    • The approved permit is then recorded within the local government building department records.
    • The inspector will also provide documentation that the permitting process has been completed and approved. This documentation is essential for a homeowner to keep for their records, for insurance purposes and when selling your home.

An Example of a San Diego Resident’s Home Insurance Policy

New Business Underwriting Guide for Homeowners
“… I. Ineligible exposures. – Any addition or alteration that was not built to local building codes or was done without proper permits.”

California Energy Commission: Letter to Homeowners on July 6, 2010

MAKE SURE YOUR CONTRACTOR GETS A PERMIT
“Please keep in mind that any contractor failing to obtain a required permit is violating the law and exposing you to additional cost and liability. Real estate law requires disclosing to potential buyers and appraisers whether required permits for work done on a home were obtained. If work was done without a required permit, you may be required to bring your home into compliance with current code requirements before selling it, in addition to possibly paying penalty permit fees and  nes. Additionally, your homeowner’s insurance policy may be voided if it is found that work was done without a required permit.”

Contractor’s State License Board: Letter to all C-20 Contractors on February 1, 2010

Pursuant to the California Mechanical Code (CMC), a building permit is required for Heating, Ventilation, and Air-Conditioning (HVAC) installations and modi cation including, but not limited to, the following:

  • New HVAC installation;
  • HVAC change out/ remodel/ replacement including the air-handler, coil, furnace or condenser;
  • Relocation of an existing HVAC unit;
  • Removal of on HVAC unit or system;
  • Adding ducting

“The failure to obtain a permit a violation of California law and exposes the homeowner to additional costs and liability. If a contractor fails to obtain a permit or performs contracting work on a project requiring a permit, the contractor is in violation of the law…”

COMMON TERMS

*PERMIT – A document provided to contractors from a governing party allowing work to be done in a residential home. The permit is issued for the protection of the homeowner.

**TITLE 24 The California Energy Code, part 6 of the California Building Standards Code which is title 24 of the California Code of Regulations, also titled The Energy Efficiency Standards for Residential and Nonresidential Buildings, were created by the California Building Standards Commission in 1978 in response to a legislative mandate to reduce California’s energy consumption. The standards are updated periodically by the California Energy Commission to allow consideration and possible incorporation of new energy efficiency technologies and methods.

***HERS RATER  Governmentally approved 3rd party agencies used to confirm that contractors meet Title 24 compliance for installation of HVAC, ductwork, and insulation.

****CITY / COUNTY INSPECTOR A building inspection is an inspection performed by a building inspector, a person who is employed by either a city, township or county and is usually certified in one or more disciplines qualifying them to make a professional judgment about whether a building meets building code requirements.

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